Occupational Asthma Reference

Burge PS, Wieland A, Robertson AS, Weir D, Occupational asthma due to unheated colophony, Brit J Industr Dis, 1986;43:559-560,

Keywords: oa, as , colophony, ch, peak flow, chemical, nc, cold

Known Authors

Sherwood Burge, Oasys Sherwood Burge

Alastair Robertson, Selly Oak Hospital Alastair Robertson

David Weir, North Manchester Hospital David Weir

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Abstract

Occupational asthma due to colophony is well recognised in the electronics industry where colophony forms part of the soldering flux. The colophony heated at soldering temperature (350-450'C) undergoes some decomposition, raising the possibility that the occupational asthma may be due to colophony breakdown products rather than to the colophony resin acids themselves. In the United Kingdom this has resulted in occupational asthma due to colophony being recognised as a prescribed disease only after exposure to electronic soldering flux. There have been isolated case reports of occupational asthma when the colophony was heated to lower temperatures; in particular a machine tool setter developed occupational asthma reproduced by heating colophony at 180'C and a chemical worker developed occupational asthma when making colophony derivatives heated to 90°C. We report the first case in which asthma has been induced by exposure to colophony at room temperature.

Plain text: Occupational asthma due to colophony is well recognised in the electronics industry where colophony forms part of the soldering flux. The colophony heated at soldering temperature (350-450'C) undergoes some decomposition, raising the possibility that the occupational asthma may be due to colophony breakdown products rather than to the colophony resin acids themselves. In the United Kingdom this has resulted in occupational asthma due to colophony being recognised as a prescribed disease only after exposure to electronic soldering flux. There have been isolated case reports of occupational asthma when the colophony was heated to lower temperatures; in particular a machine tool setter developed occupational asthma reproduced by heating colophony at 180'C and a chemical worker developed occupational asthma when making colophony derivatives heated to 90oC. We report the first case in which asthma has been induced by exposure to colophony at room temperature.

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