Oasys and Occupational Asthma

This website contains information on Occupational Asthma and a free multi award winning computer program called OASYS, which is used to help diagnose Occupational Asthma from serial peak flow records. Oasys shows further information and downloads for the Oasys program. References is a searchable database of more than 5000 published papers in the field of occupational asthma. Causes shows some of the causes of occupational asthma. The Shield scheme reports some statistics for occupational asthma, mainly in the West midlands region, UK. BOHRF shows the evidence based occupational asthma guidelines for the UK. The interactive Case Histories are a learning resource for interested health professionals. There are also Medics, Specialists, Employers and Worker sections.

Latest News

Occupational asthma: New Url for the Oasys Server New Url for the Oasys Server 16 01 2024
Occupational asthma: Occupational asthma course 2024 Occupational asthma course March 14/15 2024 - booking now live! 18 08 2023
Occupational asthma: Stopping sprayed cleaners improves asthma Stopping sprayed cleaners improves asthma 01 04 2023
Occupational asthma: Bakers asthma and rhinitis still occuring with exposure levels <1mg,m3 Bakers asthma and rhinitis still occuring with exposure levels <1mg,m3 08 01 2023
Occupational asthma: Metalworking fluid HP with no mycobacteria Metalworking fluid HP with no mycobacteria 08 01 2023

Latest Publications

Abstract Available for Trends in work-related respiratory diseases attributed to nickel, chromium and cobalt in the UK: descriptive findings from The Health and Occupation Research (THOR) network 1996–2019 Iskandar IYK, Gawkrodger DJ, Byrne L, Matthew Gittins M, Carder M, Fishwick D, van Tongeren M, Trends in work-related respiratory diseases attributed to nickel, chromium and cobalt in the UK: descriptive findings from The Health and Occupation Research (THOR) network 1996–2019, Occup Environ Med, 2024;81:220-224,https://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2023-109066
David Fishwick, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK, an author of 'Trends in work-related respiratory diseases attributed to nickel, chromium and cobalt in the UK: descriptive findings from The Health and Occupation Research (THOR) network 1996–2019' Melanie Carder, COEH Manchester, an author of 'Trends in work-related respiratory diseases attributed to nickel, chromium and cobalt in the UK: descriptive findings from The Health and Occupation Research (THOR) network 1996–2019' Martie van Tongeren, Manchester University, an author of 'Trends in work-related respiratory diseases attributed to nickel, chromium and cobalt in the UK: descriptive findings from The Health and Occupation Research (THOR) network 1996–2019'

Full Text Available for Chronic occupational exposures to irritants and asthma in the CONSTANCES cohort Sit G, Orsi L, Iwatsubo Y, Dananché B Orsi F, Goldberg M, Leynaert B, Nadif R, Ribet C, Roche N, Roquelaure Y, Varraso R, Zin M, Pilorget C, Le Moual N, Dumas O, Chronic occupational exposures to irritants and asthma in the CONSTANCES cohort, Occup Environ Med, 2024;81:129-135,http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0724-6057

Full Text Available for A 5-year follow-up study on respiratory disorders and lung
function in workers exposed to organic dust from composting
plants Bünger J, Schappler-Scheele B, Hilgers R, Hallier E, A 5-year follow-up study on respiratory disorders and lung function in workers exposed to organic dust from composting plants, Int Arch Occup Environ Health, 2007;80:306-312,DOI 10.1007/s00420-006-0135-2

Go to "References" section.

Latest Forum Questions

Can asthma be caused by stress?
Stress can make asthma symptoms worse in people who already have the condition, even though stress does not directly cause asthma. Stress can cause the body to generate specific hormones and chemicals that cause airway constriction and inflammation, two symptoms that are specific to asthma. Stress may also compromise immunity, increasing the risk of respiratory infections that exacerbate asthma symptoms in people. In addition, stress can aggravate asthma by encouraging unhealthy coping mechanisms like smoking or skipping asthma treatment appointments. In light of this, although stress may not be the main cause of asthma, people can manage their stress levels by practicing relaxation techniques, exercising, and getting support from medical specialists. This will help them better control their asthma symptoms and maintain their general health.
Occupational Asthma, Health Professional, 4/10/2024, 4/10/2024,

Comments for the paper: "Chronic occupational exposures to irritants and asthma in the CONSTANCES cohort", 2024, Occup Environ Med
A difficult study from which to draw conclusions about irritant induced occupational asthma, which is not defined and seems to include many of the agents (particularly cleaning agents and biocides) for which there are positive specific challenge tests (the SIC data is ignored in this publication). The odds ratios for current asthma were very low, both for high molecular weight sensitisers (1.05-1.16) and their irritant group (1.1), with no increased risk for low molecular weight sensitisers (probably mainly isocyanates). The data on solvent exposure is difficult to interpret. I wonder whether the use of the JEM is not sufficiently specific to identify the known increased risks for occupational asthma from many high and low molecular weight agents which are more likely acting as sensitisers.
Published Paper Comments, Specialist, 3/28/2024, 3/28/2024,

Comments for the paper: "Chronic occupational exposures to irritants and asthma in the CONSTANCES cohort", 2024, Occup Environ Med
A difficult study from which to draw conclusions about irritant induced occupational asthma, which is not defined and seems to include many of the agents (particularly cleaning agents and biocides) for which there are positive specific challenge tests (the SIC data is ignored in this publication). The odds ratios for current asthma were very low, both for high molecular weight sensitisers (1.05-1.16) and their irritant group (1.1), with no increased risk for low molecular weight sensitisers (probably mainly isocyanates). The data on solvent exposure is difficult to interpret. I wonder whether the use of the JEM is not sufficiently specific to identify the known increased risks for occupational asthma from many high and low molecular weight agents which are more likely acting as sensitisers.
Published Paper Comments, Specialist, 3/28/2024, 3/28/2024,

The Website

This website is run by the Oasys research group, part of the Midland Thoracic Society, UK. We are an independent group of clinicians and researchers, and run a clinical service for workers with occupational lung disease as part of the British National Health Service. We have developed the Oasys program to help ourselves and others in the diagnosis of occupational asthma. We have no specific funding, relying on research grants and the enthusiasm of our group. The website is written by Cedd Burge, who receives some funding from the group. The group meets every Friday evening after the occupational lung disease clinic, as shown below.



As a casual user of this site (without logging in or registering) you can view all the information and use all the contact pages. Registered and logged in users (registering is free and we won't abuse your email) can download and use the Oasys program, ask and reply to questions in the forums, leave comments, add new references, add abstracts and full text links to existing references, answer questions in the case histories and provide evidence and suggest questions for future evidence based guidelines.

If you would like to be added to the list of known authors or collaborators then please register with the website (if you have not already done so) and then get in touch from the contact page. Once we have set the page up you will be able to edit it yourself and indicate which references you have written. Your picture will then be displayed along with each of these references. If you are already in these lists and would like to edit your page then please register with the website and then get in touch from the contact page.

Funding

Recent research grants / contracts have been received from the following.

The Oasys Team

Wasif Anees, Oasys Anees, Wasif (Oasys)
John Belcher, Oasys Belcher, John (Oasys)
Phil Bright, Oasys Bright, Phil (Oasys)
Cedd Burge, Oasys Burge, Cedd (Oasys)
Geraldine Burge, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital Burge, Geraldine (Birmingham Heartlands Hospital)
Sherwood Burge, Oasys Burge, Sherwood (Oasys)
Celia Catton, Oasys Catton, Celia (Oasys)
Vicki Drought, Oasys Drought, Vicki (Oasys)
Angela Evans, ARTP Evans, Angela (ARTP)
Paul Gannon, Dupont Gannon, Paul (Dupont)
Mike Hendy, Oasys Hendy, Mike (Oasys)
Chris Huntley, University Hospitals Birmingham Huntley, Chris (University Hospitals Birmingham)
John Jackson, Jackson Hocking Limited, UK Jackson, John (Jackson Hocking Limited, UK)
Sarah Manney, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital Manney, Sarah (Birmingham Heartlands Hospital)
Jennifer McCoach (now Croft), Oasys McCoach (now Croft), Jennifer (Oasys)
Emmet McGrath, Oasys McGrath, Emmet (Oasys)
David Miedinger, Lucern, Basel and Montreal Miedinger, David (Lucern, Basel and Montreal)
Vicky Moore, Oasys Moore, Vicky (Oasys)
Darren Newton, Oasys Newton, Darren (Oasys)
Charles Pantin, Keele, UK Pantin, Charles (Keele, UK)
Edward Parkes, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital Parkes, Edward (Birmingham Heartlands Hospital)
Alastair Robertson, Selly Oak Hospital Robertson, Alastair (Selly Oak Hospital)
Arun Dev Vellore, Oasys Vellore, Arun Dev (Oasys)
Gareth Walters, Heartlands Walters, Gareth (Heartlands)
David Weir, North Manchester Hospital Weir, David (North Manchester Hospital)

Collaborators

Melanie Carder, COEH Manchester Carder, Melanie (COEH Manchester)
David Fishwick, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK Fishwick, David (Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK)
Xaver Baur, Institute of occupational medicine, Hamburg Baur, Xaver (Institute of occupational medicine, Hamburg)
Tony Newman Taylor, Royal Brompton Hospital, London Newman Taylor, Tony (Royal Brompton Hospital, London)
Josep Antó, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain Antó, Josep (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain)
Ferran Morell, Vall d'Hebron Hospital, Barcelona Morell, Ferran (Vall d'Hebron Hospital, Barcelona)
Tony Pickering, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, UK Pickering, Tony (Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, UK)
Angela Fletcher, North West Lung Centre, Manchester Fletcher, Angela (North West Lung Centre, Manchester)
Paul Cullinan, Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK Cullinan, Paul (Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK)
Annemarie Money, Manchester University Money, Annemarie (Manchester University)

Known Authors

Martie van Tongeren, Manchester University van Tongeren, Martie (Manchester University)
Monika Raulf-Heimsoth, Bochum Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika (Bochum)
David Bernstein, Cincinatti Bernstein, David (Cincinatti)
Mark Swanson, Swanson, Mark ()
Peter Burney, Kings College, London Burney, Peter (Kings College, London)
David Prezant, Albert Einstein College, New York Prezant, David (Albert Einstein College, New York)
Orianne Dumas, Villejuif, France Dumas, Orianne (Villejuif, France)
Alexandra Preisser, Hamburg Preisser, Alexandra (Hamburg)
Rolf Merget, Bochum Merget, Rolf (Bochum)
Nicola Cherry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada Cherry, Nicola (University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada)

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